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The MCTC News Blog

MCTC Hosts National Photography Exhibit “Always Lost: A Meditation on War”

Posted on: December 9th, 2014 by marketingworkstudy No Comments

Always Lost photo exhibitExhibit runs Dec. 15–Jan. 23; features award-winning photos and literary works about war

Minneapolis Community and Technical College (MCTC) is honored to host the national traveling photography exhibit titled Always Lost: A Meditation on War. The memorial, comprised of thousands of photographs of U.S. military veterans and various literary works, was created by Western Nevada College and has been touring the country since 2010. It has received praise nationwide for its poignant memorials of past, current and future veterans.

The exhibit will be on display on the third floor of the MCTC Helland Student Center between Dec. 15 and Jan. 23 and can be viewed during MCTC’s hours of operation. A private space will be available adjacent to the exhibit for reflection. Images in the exhibit may contain graphic content and may not be suitable for children.

“The exhibit allows us to reflect on the costs of war, and highlights the importance of bringing service members all the way home, not just physically, but mentally and emotionally as well,” said Miki Huntington, MCTC Political Science instructor and veteran.

MCTC will host the exhibit in support of its participation in the statewide Beyond the Yellow Ribbon (BYTR) initiative. This initiative is intended to provide comprehensive support, resources and recognition for veterans on college campuses. The MCTC BTYR initiative is driven by a committee consisting of students, faculty and staff at the College.

Nursing Alumni Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

Posted on: December 1st, 2014 by marketingworkstudy No Comments
Nursing

Students in MCTC’s Nursing program.

Mpls.St.Paul Magazine awarded MCTC nursing alumni Be Ho a Lifetime Achievement Award for her more than 30 years of work in the field. Be earned her associate degree in Nursing at MCTC in the 1980s shortly after her time as a nurse in the Vietnam War, and is currently working with Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota.

Read her full story on the Children’s Hospital blog.

 

Nurse with inspirational story receives lifetime achievement award

By Erin Keifenheim

Be Ho, staff RN, surgery, knew she wanted to be a nurse when she was 4½ years old, yet she never imagined that following her dream would lead her on a journey to flee her home country and start a new life halfway around the world. Now celebrating her 34th year at Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Be recently was named the 2014 Lifetime Achievement winner in the annual Mpls.St.Paul Magazine Outstanding Nurses awards for her amazing nursing skills and perseverance to follow her dream.

Be’s inspirational story starts in Vietnam, where she was born. When her father had abdominal surgery in the French-run hospital there, Be was mesmerized by the French nurses with their blue eyes, long eyelashes and surgical gowns, and the kindness they showed her family. She knew from that moment that she would become a nurse someday. At the age of 9, she pleaded with her parents to send her to nursing school. She cried so much that they finally arranged a meeting for her with the director of a local hospital. He convinced her to hold off on becoming a nurse until she was old enough. Finally, when Be was 17, she couldn’t wait any longer.

“At that time, nursing was looked down on as a career,” Be said. “Girls were supposed to stay at home. Nurses were viewed as the ones who did the dirty work – changing diapers and cleaning wounds. I didn’t dare tell my family I was applying for nursing school.”

Instead, Be lied to her parents, telling them she was going to visit her cousin in the capital, but she actually took the entrance exam for nursing school. Three months later, she didn’t have the heart to sneak away again to find out the results. However, her neighbor had gone to see the results of his fiancée’s exam and saw Be’s name on the list. He came over to congratulate her, thus breaking the news to her parents. Her mother cried and was resistant, but her father persuaded her to allow Be to go to nursing school – he knew she would be a wonderful nurse; he was right. Be went on to graduate second in her class. And because she always knew she wanted to work with children, she took a job at a children’s hospital in Saigon. She eventually went on to become the hospital’s director of nursing.

In 1968, Be received a scholarship to travel to England for intensive nursing care training. In 1972, she visited Minneapolis with a group of young patients who needed open-heart surgeries. The Children’s Heart Fund, now Children’s HeartLink, sponsored her to escort the patients and care for them while they were here. During that trip, she formed relationships with the staff at Children’s – Minneapolis who thought very highly of her and recognized her potential.

Back in Vietnam, the war was continuing. Because Be had traveled outside the country multiple times, the communist leaders suspected her of being a spy.

“Every week I had to write an essay to the communist government saying that I was the country’s enemy,” Be said. “One day I was brave enough to ask why I was being forced to write these letters. They told me ‘because you are such a good nurse.’ It was very hard for me to say I was an enemy when all I wanted to do was provide nurturing and loving nursing care – just like the French nurses I saw as a child.”

Eventually, Be became worried about her future in Vietnam. Her colleagues at Children’s Heart Fund attempted to evacuate her in 1975, but she couldn’t bear to leave without saying goodbye to her family. Though she feared for her life, she said a tearful goodbye to her friends and remained in Vietnam. A few years later, she knew it was time to escape. She contacted her U.S. colleagues for assistance, under the guise that she needed to have open-heart surgery in Japan.

“I had to lie again to escape Vietnam. If I was caught, I would be sent to a concentration camp,” Be said. “I told the hospital I was working for that my grandmother was dying, when she had actually died before I was born.”

Arrangements were made for Be to travel by boat to a refugee camp in Thailand.

“I had to leave without saying goodbye to my family. I wanted to protect them in case the communist government came looking for me. I wrote a letter to my dad and left. It was very scary,” she said. “I didn’t know anyone. It was getting dark. We had to hide under coconut leaves on the boat to disguise ourselves from the communist police who were chasing us. When we finally made it to international waters, I was so happy I cried.”

Be spent five months in the refugee camp, where she worked as a clinic nurse and as a translator for the U.S. delegation. It was there that she also met her now husband, who found her in the crowd of new arrivals and arranged for her to have a place to sleep. While the camp provided safety, she knew there was more out there for her, and soon she was sponsored to work in the U.S. In August of 1980, Be arrived in Minnesota.

“I knew I wanted to work at Children’s Hospital,” Be said. “It was a place of comfort for me. I talked with the director of nursing, but because my nursing papers and transcripts were thrown overboard by pirates during my escape, I had no official paperwork. They hired me as a nursing assistant in the PICU, and I was so grateful.”

With the help of a Children’s scholarship, Be went back to school full time and got her associate’s degree in nursing from Minneapolis Community and Technical College. She was then hired as a registered nurse at Children’s and worked on 4 East (now the sixth floor), before eventually transferring to surgery.

Be is now the urology team leader in the surgery department and works with surgeons and staff to make sure they have the instruments and supplies needed for a variety of surgeries. She works to onboard new surgery nurses in urology and across other services, too.

“With every patient she works with, Be is calm, comforting and compassionate,” said Pat Buzzell, patient care manager for the surgery department. “She takes care of the whole family, reassures them and educates them so surgery isn’t a scary experience. She comes in on her days off to conduct patient family tours, and she often stays late to check in on patients. She does whatever it takes to make families comfortable, using her cheerful personality to calm their fears and put them at ease.”

Be still has a deep love for Vietnam and returns there on medical missions to provide care for children at the hospital where she used to work. She has recruited Children’s surgeons and staff to join her on these trips, where they provide education to medical teams and perform surgeries.

“Be gives everything to her patients, whether they are here or in Vietnam,” Pat said. “She works tirelessly to advocate for them, and she doesn’t give up. Because of the journey she has had and how hard she has worked to get here, Be refuses to settle for anything less than perfection. She believes in hard work and practice and has earned the respect of the surgeons, anesthesiologists and all staff on our unit. Be says it’s an honor to work with kids – I say it’s an honor to work with Be.”

Now almost 70 and pondering when to retire, Be gets emotional when she thinks about potentially leaving Children’s – her second home.

“I am so grateful to Children’s Hospital for all they have done for me,” she said. “Without them, I wouldn’t be here now. This country took me in, but this hospital gave me a second chance for my life. I love Children’s Hospital from the bottom of my heart.”

State Budget Allows for Two-Year Tuition Freeze

Posted on: July 24th, 2013 by insidemctc No Comments

Photo: MCTC put tuition on ice.Amidst concerns of the growing cost of college and mounting student debt, Minnesota State Colleges and Universities (MnSCU) is freezing tuition at each of its 31 campuses for two fiscal years. As a result, Minneapolis Community and Technical College (MCTC) tuition will remain at its current levels for the next two years.

The two-year tuition freeze was made possible by a $78 million appropriation by the state legislature during the 2013 session. In addition to the tuition freeze, changes in the state grant program will ensure grants for approximately 7,700 MnSCU college students in the 2013-14 academic year. The largest increases in the numbers of state grant recipients are projected to occur among part-time students. “With this budget, we remain the state’s highest value and most affordable higher education option by significant margins,” said MnSCU Chancellor Steven Rosenstone.

Many students opt to begin their higher education careers at a community or technical college and later transfer to four-year universities, saving tens of thousands of dollars on tuition in the process. The MnSCU tuition freeze ensures transfer students will continue to see this degree of savings for the next two years. In addition to these guaranteed savings, MCTC offers need- and merit-based grants and scholarships to qualifying students.

“The state support is a wonderful benefit to our students,” said Scott Erickson, vice president of finance and operations at MCTC. “This tuition freeze will help our students better plan to cover the cost of education, knowing our rates will not increase for the next two years.”

“Affordable tuition, together with grants to address unmet financial need, will help open the door to educational opportunity for students from all backgrounds,” said Chancellor Rosenstone.

The application deadline for the fall semester is August 9. Click here to apply.

Photo: MCTC tuition compared with other colleges.

MCTC’s 2013 Method Portfolio Best of Show Peer-to-Peer Award Winners

Posted on: May 20th, 2013 by insidemctc No Comments
MCTC's Method portfolio student Peer-to-Peer award winners

From left to right, 2013 Method portfolio best of show winners Brenda Y. Ngo, Ryan Hoffman and Linsey Peterson.

They are all winners.

But the students of this year’s MCTC graphic and web design portfolio class have singled a few students out for exceptional work in their culminating Method design show.

Linsey Peterson, Ryan Hoffman and Brenda Ngo were awarded first, second and third place in the Best of Show Peer-to-Peer Portfolio Contest. Three students, Clare O’Neill, Claire Bailey and Victoria Dibble, tied for an Honorable Mention award. Award recipients are chosen via vote by portfolio students themselves. First, second and third place winners are given degrees of Adobe Creative Suite software. This award is funded by Graphic and Web Design alum Manuel Castellanos Raboso and Graphic Design instructor Jake Jacobson.

In the voting process, each portfolio student was given the opportunity to award three votes to their peers covering several evaluative areas:

  • Overall creative presentation of the portfolio
  • Overall creativity, focus, and uniqueness portfolio
  • Overall continuity in presentation of portfolio
  • Overall leadership and team/class participation of Method 2013
  • Overall design principles presented in the portfolio
  • Overall body of creative work
  • Overall representation of the ideals of the creative design industry and their Method 2013 stated mission

Read more about the Graphic Design program at MCTC here.

MCTC Students Participate and Win in SkillsUSA Leadership and Skills Conference

Posted on: May 17th, 2013 by insidemctc No Comments
MCTC students and faculty.

From left to right: MCTC instructor Greg Skudlarek and students Reed Sweeney, Tom Pederson, Andy Gurskis and John Singel.

Minneapolis Community and Technical College students competed in the SkillsUSA Minnesota Leadership and Skills Conference last month, and several of them won awards for their hard work and creative projects. SkillsUSA is a national nonprofit organization serving teachers and high school and college students who are preparing for careers in trade, technical and skilled service occupations as well as health occupations. Top SkillsUSA state performers include the following MCTC students:

  • Andy Gurskis, 2nd place, HVACR
  • Reed Sweeney, 4th place and honorable mention, HVACR
  • Max Foutch, 3rd place, Industrial Motor Controls
  • Tom Hermes, 4th place and honorable mention, Industrial Motor Controls
MCTC students and faculty

From left to right: Tom Hiltner, Tom Hermans, Max Foutch, Mark Eckstein and Dean Weikle.

In July, 2012, MCTC HVACR student Chad Rubey placed fifth out of 28 college competitors in the national SkillUSA Championship. At the annual national-level SkillsUSA Championships, over 5,600 students compete in 94 occupational and leadership skill areas.

SkillsUSA programs include local, state and national competitions in which students demonstrate occupational and leadership skills.