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Biotechnology Program Named Finalist for Tekne Awards

Posted on: September 22nd, 2014 by marketingworkstudy No Comments

TekneBiotechSTORYThe Minnesota High Tech Association (MHTA) named Minneapolis Community and Technical College’s Biotechnology Program as one of 36 finalists for the 15th annual Tekne Awards, which will be held on Thursday, Nov. 13 at the Minneapolis Convention Center.

The program is a finalist in the workforce development award category, which honors innovative approaches to training workers in transition or youth with technology skills and successfully matching them to jobs that meet the needs of Minnesota companies. Other category finalists include Creating IT Futures Foundation (Downers, IL) and Genesis 10 (St. Paul).

“For 15 years, the MHTA has honored the technological innovators of Minnesota,” said Margaret Anderson Kelliher, president of MHTA. “We’re delighted to see such a fantastic display of technological advancements this year, and are proud to shine a light on our state’s outstanding science and technology industry.”

Finalists will gather to be recognized for their vast achievements in the state’s tech-based economy. The finalists span twelve categories recognizing the organizations, products and leaders driving technological innovation locally. The Tekne Awards honor those who have played a part in discovering new technologies impacting the lives and futures of people living in Minnesota and all over the world.

“MCTC’s biotechnology program is interdisciplinary, leading to multiple career paths and diverse higher education opportunities, serving biotech students and science majors. We are very grateful to MCTC and Minnesota State Colleges and Universities support for making this happen,” said Chemistry and Biotechnology faculty Rehka Ganaganur.

This nomination comes two years after the College announced a biotechnology partnership with the University of Minnesota and Ganganur recognizes how local academic and industry partners have come together to make Biotechnology a unique, award-worthy program.

“Minnesota’s scientific industry, and the universities of higher education including the University of Minnesota have made the program robust through extending a wide range of partnerships, transfer of courses, equipment, internships, jobs, scholarships and research opportunities,” said Ganaganur. “We also thank the LifeScience Alley, BioBusiness Alliance of Minnesota, Mayo Clinic, and national centers of bioscience such as the BioLink and Cold Spring Harbor Labs, for all the support and partnerships they have provided in many ways.”

Ah-Nung: Putting the “Community” in Community College

Posted on: September 17th, 2014 by marketingworkstudy No Comments

Ah-NungMatrious

Ah-Nung Matrious was looking for a fresh start when she came to MCTC last fall after a less-than-stellar experience at a previous college. In her short time at the College, she’s already made an impact in the student community by means of collaboration and conversation.

When she started at the College, Ah-Nung was encouraged to join the United Nations of Indian Tribes Education (UNITE) student club.

“They were beat when I joined,” she said. “We all took on responsibilities to make improvements happen.”

Ah-Nung and the other members worked together to turn the club around. They mended broken ties with other student groups and increased accountability.

“We all revamped UNITE’s outlook as a student organization,” she said. “There may have been some struggles, but we overcame them and now we are stronger and more involved than ever.”

A key component to the club’s turnaround included collaboration. Ah-Nung and UNITE began working together to host events with another MCTC student club, Xicanos Latinos Unidos (XLU). The collaboration started with a potluck that brought members of the two clubs together to share their cultural foods and get to know each other. Members of the clubs also played a Jeopardy-style game and answered questions about Native American and Latino culture. Both clubs learned about each other’s cultures in ways they never thought they would.

“We went out of our way to forget about cliques and interact with each other,” Ah-Nung said.

The collaboration spanned other student groups as well. UNITE, in collaboration with the Student Veteran Association (SVA), reached out to other clubs to collect funds for an all-College barbeque. Ah-Nung saw it as an opportunity to create the atmosphere that she felt at the potluck, except on a larger scale. Hundreds turned out for the barbeque and she has even bigger plans for the next one.

“I think our collaboration started a trend,” Ah-Nung said. “It created a bigger sense of community.”

Ah-Nung’s Native American values are tied into her aspirations for the campus. Included in those values are community, unity and contribution. She knows that she won’t accomplish her goals alone, but will be successful with the help of her peers.

“We are always working together to look out for the future of our loved ones,” she said. “If those other student organizations and individual students didn’t help me or contribute, nothing great would have been accomplished.”

Before she came to MCTC, Ah-Nung was living on a secluded reservation in Hinckley, Minn. Coming to the Twin Cities was a shock for her.

“People who live in the boondocks often don’t have much, if any, experience interacting with people of other cultures,” she said.

Ah-Nung, currently the president of the MCTC Student Senate, is hopeful by the time she’s graduated next spring that she’s created a better sense of campus community for current and future students.

“One of the best things I like about MCTC is regardless of race or background, I have a lot of support,” she said. “I’m very thankful that they have given me the opportunities to let me do what I’ve done.”

Discover 12 Ways MCTC Can Work for YOU

Posted on: September 15th, 2014 by insidemctc No Comments

MCTC Works Oct 2014

Discover 12 ways MCTC can work for you

Register now for the October open house!

  1. Make more money
  2. Find jobs and network with employers who hire our graduates
  3. Save thousands of dollars
  4. Transfer easily to Metropolitan State, the University of Minnesota or other colleges of your choice
  5. Choose from more than 130 programs
  6. Connect with a diverse student body
  7. Learn from award-winning faculty
  8. Get involved and make a difference
  9. Stand out–seven MCTC students named to the Phi Theta Kappa All-USA Community College Academic Team
  10. Be successful–our alumni have made significant contributions throughout their careers and in their communities
  11. Give us a try–attend one of our hands-on career exploration summer camps (ages 13-18)
  12. Visit us on campus or in your community to learn how MCTC can work for you!

Visit Us at Our Open House

Date: Tuesday, October 21
Time: 5–7 p.m.
Location: Minneapolis Community and Technical College, T Building
1501 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis (free parking in the MCTC ramp)

Register now!

5th Annual “Operation Recovery” Addresses the Stigma of Drug and Alcohol Recovery

Posted on: September 9th, 2014 by insidemctc No Comments
Operation Recovery logo

What’s in YOUR medicine cabinet?

In recognition of National Recovery Month, the MCTC Addiction Counseling program and student club are hosting the fifth annual Operation Recovery Sept. 18, 10 a.m.–3 p.m. on the MCTC outdoor plaza.

Event organizers invite everyone from the community to attend the event in an effort to overcome stigma affiliated with drug and alcohol recovery. Last year, the event drew 1,200 students and community members and provided education, guidance and celebration from members of MCTC’s Addiction Counseling program, its students, local treatment centers, 12 Step programs and other local health programs. The event raised funds for Students Against Hunger and Homelessness, an MCTC student club which provides support for students experiencing homelessness.

This year’s event is marked by the recent passage of Steve’s Law during the 2014 legislative session. The law provides immunity to individuals who contact police to report a drug overdose, and allows first responders to carry Narcan, a drug designed to prevent death from opiate overdose. Key players in the law’s introduction and success will be at Operation Recovery, including Hennepin County Sheriff Richard Stanek, State Senator Chris Eaton who introduced the law and Lexi Reed Holtum from the Steve Rummler Hope Foundation, for whom Steve’s Law is named.

This year’s event will include:

  • 30+ community programs providing information on addiction, recovery and related resources
  • Speakers including Hennepin County Sheriff Richard Stanek, State Senator Chris Eaton and Lexi Reed Holtum from the Steve Rummler Hope Foundation
  • Free obstacle course
  • Raffle for great prizes
  • Cake walk and gift card giveaways
  • Free popcorn and cotton candy

To read about one of MCTC’s Addiction Counseling alumni and the success he experienced while in the program, click here. For a closer look at some of the events that took place at last year’s event, take a look at MCTC’s Facebook album!

MCTC Student Receives National Award for Research

Posted on: August 26th, 2014 by marketingworkstudy No Comments

20140730_1501323432Following an invitation to present her findings at the Minnesota capitol recently, MCTC student Shequaya Broadus was honored at the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Conference in Boston this summer for her research on bacteria in the Mississippi River. 

ASM awards undergraduate and graduate students every year for their biology research with the Capstone Award. MCTC Biology faculty and ASM member Dr. Renu Bhagat Kumar saw the award as an opportunity for student recognition and informed research students, including Broadus who was undertaking pertinent research, of the award.

“It’s a very prestigious award that few students receive,” said Dr. Kumar.

Broadus and two other students, had begun research the previous summer on the effect industrialization and modern agricultural practices have on bacteria in environmental soil and water. Samples taken from the Mississippi River showed the bacteria had tolerated higher concentrations of metal in the water.

“Our aim was to understand the possible mechanisms of metal resistance these different microbes use and harvest it for bioremediation and possible metal reclamation,” Broadus said.

The three students received assistance throughout their research from multiple MCTC Science instructors, other college lab assistants as well as access to laboratories in the Science Center. The students are also members of the MCTC Science Club, which helped fund their research.

Through a grant awarded to Dr. Kumar from the Education Minnesota Foundation and financial support from MCTC, Dr. Kumar accompanied Broadus to the ASM conference where the research was presented to scholars and peers from around the world.

“Naturally, I felt honored,” Broadus said, “and maybe a bit nervous because I hadn’t ever presented at a scientific convention at the local level, let alone nationally.”

Dean Chuck Paulson commends Broadus and the other students on their accomplishment.

“This is a big deal,” he said. “It’s a rare accomplishment for a community college.”

After finishing up the last of their research, the students hope to see their work published in an academic journal. Dr. Kumar’s students are the latest example of impressive research to come from MCTC students as well as the high-quality academic experience provided at community colleges.

According to Broadus, her experience performing research at MCTC has encouraged her to pursue a career in biomedical research.